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The Morris County Sheriff’s Office and Local Police Chiefs Forge Bonds With Jewish Chabad Center Leaders

The Morris County Sheriff’s Office and other law enforcement agencies in Morris County have been building bridges with the Chabad community, a dynamic movement and force within the Jewish community.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, Morris County Prosecutor Fredric M. Knapp and Morris County Police Chiefs met earlier this summer with Jewish leaders of Chabad Centers to start a dialogue about security concerns and community goals.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, Morris County Prosecutor Fredric M. Knapp and Morris County Police Chiefs met earlier this summer with Jewish leaders of Chabad Centers to start a dialogue about security concerns and community goals.

With 14 of 59 Chabad Centers currently situated in New Jersey based in Morris County, Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, Sheriff’s Office Detective Lieutenant Denise Thornton, Morris County Prosecutor Fredric M. Knapp and 17 Morris County police chiefs or department representatives met earlier this summer with Chabad leaders to develop a dialogue and hear concerns that include violence against religious institutions.

The session brought together the religious leaders, Rabbi Moshe Herson of the Rabbinical College of America, and Morris County law enforcement leaders, including Morris County Chiefs of Police Association President, Butler Police Chief Ciro Cimento.

Sheriff Gannon reiterated his policy, in cooperation with municipal police departments, of conducting direct patrols and taking extra security measures around all 317 houses of worship in Morris County.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, Morris County Prosecutor Fredric M. Knapp and Morris County Police Chiefs met earlier this summer with Jewish leaders of Chabad Centers to have a dialogue about security concerns and harmonious involvement with neighbors and the community.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, Morris County Prosecutor Fredric M. Knapp and Morris County Police Chiefs met earlier this summer with Jewish leaders of Chabad Centers to have a dialogue about security concerns and harmonious involvement with neighbors and the community.

Chabad centers serve the local communities by providing educational, religious and social services that are open to all community members. No background or particular affiliations are needed and no membership is required.

Chabad centers offer Jewish holiday programs, adult education, hospital visitation, senior citizen visitation, senior citizen programs, food for the needy, study groups and tutoring, counseling services and crisis intervention, Bar and Bat Mitzvah training, a Women’s Circle, Shabbat and holiday services, among other activities.

There are nearly 4,000 Chabad Centers around the world today.

During this summer’s meeting with Chabad leaders, they were informed that Patrick Owens, Director of the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office Critical Infrastructure Unit, can provide guidance on insuring the safety of worshippers.

“The ability to assemble and worship in peace is one of our nation’s enduring rights. The Morris County Sheriff’s Office wants the Chabad community and members of all faiths to know that we are committed to keeping them safe so they can worship without hesitation or fear,” Sheriff Gannon said.

The summer meeting led to the establishment of direct dialogues between Chabad leaders and Morris County police chiefs, and plans were made to gather again in the fall of 2019.

 

Morris County Sheriff’s Office Advises Residents of Telephone Scam Demanding Money Under Threat Of Arrest

The Morris County Sheriff’s Office is advising the Morris County community that a telephone scam resurfaced on August 9, 2019, in which a caller identified himself as a Sergeant with the Morris County Sheriff’s Office and warned residents that they would be arrested if an outstanding fine was not paid immediately.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon

Sheriff James M. Gannon said: “In the event these fraudulent calls are received, residents should never give their personal or financial information over the phone, nor should they arrange to meet someone to provide a prepaid credit card.  The Morris County Sheriff’s Office will never solicit methods of payment and/or personal identifiers over the phone.”

A similar telephone scam last targeted Morris County residents, and communities nationwide, in December 2018.

In 2017, and in January and May of 2018, scams surfaced of people posing as officers who sought personal information and Green Dot MoneyPak cards for false warrants, civil process fees, overdue IRS payments and non-appearance for jury duty. Residents should notify local police agencies if they receive such calls.

ALL AGENCY INFORMATION AND CONTACTS CAN BE ACCESSED AND VERIFIED THROUGH THE MORRIS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE WEBSITE AT WWW.SHERIFF.MORRISCOUNTYNJ.GOV

Any suspicious calls regarding the Morris County Sheriff’s Office can also be directed to 973-285-6600 during the day and 973-285-2900 after hours for verification of agency personnel.

Morris County Sheriff's Office Advises Residents of Telephone Scam Demanding Money Under Threat Of Arrest

Crime Prevention Tips to Help Avoid Falling Victim to this Scam:

  • Legitimate law enforcement agencies will not tell people to provide money card information to avoid arrest.
  • Be suspicious of callers who demand immediate payment for any reason.
  • Never give out personal or financial information to anyone who emails or calls you unsolicited.
  • Never wire money, provide debt or credit card numbers or Green Dot Money Pak card numbers to someone you do not know.
  • Remember that anyone who has the number on a Green Dot Money Pak card, has access to the funds on the card.
  • If you have received a phone scam call, try to gather names, the phone number and location given, and report the information to police.

Report tips and remain anonymous by contacting the Morris County Sheriff’s CrimeStoppers at 973-COP-CALL or www.copcall.org from your mobile device. NO ONE WILL ASK YOUR NAME!

 

Michael Wallin Memorial Golf Classic in Parsippany Benefits People In the Grip of Opioid Addiction

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon thanked dozens of golfers and the family of the late Michael Robert Wallin who participated August 9 in a charity golf tournament that benefits people struggling with opioid addiction.

From left, state Assemblyman Anthony M. Bucco, Rusty Wallin of Mountain Lakes, and Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon at the Michael Wallin Memorial Golf Classic that benefits people struggling with addiction.
From left, state Assemblyman Anthony M. Bucco, Rusty Wallin of Mountain Lakes, and Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon at the Michael Wallin Memorial Golf Classic that benefits people struggling with addiction.

Sheriff Gannon didn’t swing a club at the Knoll Country Club in Parsippany on Friday but he spoke at the luncheon after about 80 golfers finished their games in the 2nd annual Michael Wallin Memorial Golf Classic.

Two golf tournaments and a third fundraiser in Michael Wallin’s name have collectively raised about $50,000 for the Rockaway-based Center for Addiction Recovery, Education & Success (CARES), which engages and organizes the recovery community by assisting people through peer support, sober recreation and a stigma-free approach to overcoming addiction. Some of the funds have specifically helped uninsured people with substance use disorders receive in-patient treatment.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon addresses golfers who participated in the August 9 Michael Wallin Memorial Golf Classic.  The proceeds are donated to assist people struggling with addiction find treatment.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon addresses golfers who participated in the August 9 Michael Wallin Memorial Golf Classic. The proceeds are donated to assist people struggling with addiction find treatment.

Michael Wallin, who grew up in Mountain Lakes, died on April 21, 2017, at the age of 32. He served in the U.S. Coast Guard, was a skilled carpenter and loved sports – including golf.  According to his close-knit family, including parents Rusty and Eileen Wallin, addiction overtook Michael quickly and led to his death.

“He was a tremendous athlete and he would have loved the tournament. He would have loved seeing everyone. Addiction hits home. It’s right in your backyard,” Eileen Wallin said.

Sheriff Gannon’s signature Hope One mobile substance use resource and recovery program, launched on April 3, 2017, is partnered with CARES and the Mental Health Association of Essex and Morris counties. Sheriff Gannon thanked the Wallin family for selflessly reaching out to help others after Michael’s death instead of withdrawing into their grief.

“Out of a tragedy this is what’s happened.  People being cared for that could have passed. Let’s keep Michael and the family in your thoughts and prayers,” Sheriff Gannon said.

He said that Hope One and the non-profit entities CARES and Daytop-New Jersey, which state Assemblyman Anthony M. Bucco helped found, are all committed to helping people overcome addiction.

“We’re moving the needle in the right direction through things like CARES, through programs going on there and their partnership on the truck known as Hope One,” the Sheriff said.

The Michael Wallin Memorial Fund recognizes the biggest barriers for people seeking treatment are money and transportation. Donations to the fund have been used for the initial cost of treatment, and have fully funded treatment options that include detox, in-patient and intensive outpatient treatment. Funds also have been used to assist people with down payments for sober living opportunities.