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Morris County Sheriff’s Office Reaches Milestone of 500 County ID Cards Issued To At-Risk Residents

The Morris County Sheriff’s Office has achieved the milestone of issuing 500 photo Identification Cards to Morris County residents, enabling many to access vital medical and social services and even obtain a library card.

Sheriff’s Office Senior System Analyst Russell Moser reached the benchmark on June 23, virtually three years to the day that Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon launched the Morris County ID Card program on June 22, 2017, in partnership with the Morris County Department of Human Services.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon with Sheriff's Office Senior System Analyst Russell Moser.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon with Sheriff’s Office Senior System Analyst Russell Moser.

Free to Morris County residents between the ages of 18 and 54, the photo ID Card program was designed to help at-risk and struggling individuals – particularly those who may lack a driver’s license – prove their names and residency so they can  access medical, rehabilitative, housing and other social service programs.

After the Sheriff, the Chief Sheriff’s Officer or a Captain verify the identity of ID Card applicants through other supporting documents, Analyst Moser issues the plastic, credit card-sized IDs that contain the individual’s name, address, birthdate, gender, height, weight and eye color.  The cards are valid for four years.

The ID cards are part of a mosaic of programs that Sheriff Gannon has started since taking office in January 2017, some in partnership with other departments or non-profit agencies, that assist at-risk individuals.  The Sheriff credited Analyst Moser with approaching the duty with empathy and a desire to help individuals in need.

“All our programs begin with proper identification. A person cannot get into rehab, detox or intensive out-patient programs without ID.  Talking about literacy, a person cannot get a library book without ID,” Sheriff Gannon said.

“I’d suggest this may be one of the most important things we do in providing services to people. The people who come to us for ID are those with issues of addiction, mental health disorders, and perhaps homelessness. It’s rewarding to me, and it’s rewarding to Russ (Moser) because we do see people standing up a little taller when they leave than when they entered,” Sheriff Gannon said.

The cards, labeled Official Morris County Identification Card, are valid only for identification purposes and may not necessarily be accepted by certain agencies that require a state ID. They can be used as back-up identity documentation and assist a person in obtaining additional proofs of ID.

The Office of the Morris County Clerk separately issues Identification Cards to individuals 55 years of age or older and to U.S. veterans.

To obtain a Morris County Identification Card from the Morris County Sheriff’s Office, an individual must prove his or her citizenship or legal status by presenting a U.S. birth certificate, a valid U.S. passport, a permanent resident card, or a naturalization certificate/certificate of citizenship.

In addition, applicants must prove his or her identity and Morris County residency by presenting a valid New Jersey driver’s license or a New Jersey Non-Driver ID Card, or alternatively, two items such as a valid library card, voter registration card, auto registration, Social Security Card, health insurance or work ID with a photo, plus a recent mailing to his or her home address.

For more information on the program and how to obtain a Morris County ID Card, please visit:

https://sheriff.morriscountynj.gov/community/morris-county-id-card/

 

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon and Officers Help Partners Welcome People In Need To Food Distribution Site At County College of Morris

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon and Agency Officers joined Table of Hope and County College of Morris leaders and volunteers Tuesday in distributing free produce, canned goods, meat and dairy products from the CCM campus to anyone in need.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, joined by Teresa Williams, greets volunteers at the Table of Hope Mobile Food Pantry distribution at County College of Morris on June 23.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, joined by Teresa Williams, greets volunteers at the Table of Hope Mobile Food Pantry distribution at County College of Morris on June 23.

The event on June 23 drew supportive appearances from New Jersey First Lady Tammy Snyder Murphy and United States Congresswoman Mikie Sherrill, who applauded the generous outreach at a time when many families have been economically devastated by the COVID-19 healthcare crisis.

The food distribution was primarily hosted by County College of Morris and Table of Hope Mobile Food Pantry, a non-profit program of the Morristown-based Spring Street Community Development Corporation (Spring Street CDC).

Student and community volunteers turned out to assist with sorting and bagging lentils, cereals, dried cherries, meat, tuna fish, and an abundance of lettuce, tomatoes and other vegetables donated by Alstede Farms.  Morris County Sheriff’s Officers, along with CCM Security Officers, were responsible for traffic control, ingress and egress from the site but many helped unload trucks and carry boxes to prepping tables.

Volunteers sort groceries during the June 23 Table of Hope Mobile Food Pantry food distribution at County College of Morris.
Volunteers sort groceries during the June 23 Table of Hope Mobile Food Pantry food distribution at County College of Morris.

A team from the Morris County Sheriff’s Office Hope One mobile addiction and mental health outreach program was on-scene to pass out literature but team members also spent much of their time separating food items and loading groceries into bags.

Morristown Pastor Sidney Williams and his wife, Teresa Williams, formed the Spring Street CDC about 10 years ago, and since March have distributed more than two tons of food to people in need around Morris County through the Table of Hope Mobile Food Pantry.

As vehicles were lining up for the no-contact distribution of bags of food placed in their trunks by volunteers, Sheriff Gannon and others commended the mission to keep families nourished and healthy throughout the pandemic.

“I’m very honored to be here and very honored to be your Morris County Sheriff,” he said. “This is a partnership.  What I see when I look out here today is people who are going to make a direct difference in the lives of other people. These are our neighbors, these are our friends. It’s a tough year, 2020.”

Morris County Sheriff's Office Detective Andreas Zaharopoulos, in blue shirt, and Sheriff's Officer Stephen Chiarella, in yellow vest, assist at a food distribution event at County College of Morris on June 23.
Morris County Sheriff’s Office Detective Andreas Zaharopoulos, in blue shirt, and Sheriff’s Officer Stephen Chiarella, in yellow vest, assist at a food distribution event at County College of Morris on June 23.

“This has affected people all across our county, all across our state and nation.  It’s great to play a small part,” the Sheriff said.

CCM President Dr. Anthony Iacono, whose wife and son volunteered at the event, introduced First Lady Murphy, Congresswoman Sherrill, state Senator Anthony Bucco, Morris County Freeholder John Krickus, Pastor Williams and his wife, and others in short, pre-distribution remarks.

All emphasized the need to work harmoniously, without divisiveness, during a crisis.

“You have incredible partnerships here. No one is looking at anyone else and saying ‘Why are you here?’ That’s one of the best things about Morris County,” said First Lady Murphy.

She highlighted Table of Hope’s impact on the community by saying “I think Table of Hope has always served a really important role in the county. If you don’t know you should know, in the last two months Table of Hope has served over two tons of food.”

New Jersey First Lady Tammy Murphy speaks at the June 23 free food distribution to people in need hosted by Table of Hope Mobile Food Pantry and County College of Morris.
New Jersey First Lady Tammy Murphy speaks at the June 23 free food distribution for people in need hosted by Table of Hope Mobile Food Pantry and County College of Morris.

Mrs. Williams told the volunteers she was simply happy to work with committed volunteers, while Rev. Williams credited Community Food Bank of New Jersey Chief Executive Officer Carlos Rodriguez for his partnership with Table of Hope.

“None of this would be possible without the tremendous help of our partners and networks, like Table of Hope.  The leadership here is really second to none. Just remember, to fight hunger, to nourish New Jersey, it takes all sectors coming together the way we’re experiencing today,” Mr. Rodriguez said.

 

 

 

 

 

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon To Join Table Of Hope And County College of Morris Leaders at Food Distribution Event

New Jersey First Lady Tammy Snyder Murphy will be joining Table of Hope, local officials and scores of volunteers who are gathering together for a free mobile food distribution event at County College of Morris (CCM) on Tuesday, June 23, to assist residents during this time of crisis.

Table of Hope Mobile Food Pantry at a food distribution event at Liquid Church in Parsippany.
Table of Hope Mobile Food Pantry at a food distribution event at Liquid Church in Parsippany.

The food distribution, consisting of canned goods, meat, dairy, vegetables and other groceries, will take place in Parking Lot 1 on the CCM campus starting at 10 a.m. and running until noon. Welcoming remarks from the First Lady and others will take place at 9:45 a.m. All are welcome to attend. Visitors are asked to use the college’s Dover Chester Road entrance. Face coverings are required for everyone who comes to campus.

The distribution will operate as a contactless drive-through event with cars stopping at different food stations categorized by food type where volunteers will place bags or boxes into automobile trunks.

Shortly after COVID-19 struck, Rev. Dr. Sidney Williams, pastor of Bethel Church in Morristown, converted the Table of Hope bus that was used to pick up food so it could be utilized for mobile food distribution. Williams is the founder of the Spring Street Community Development Corporation that operates Table of Hope and other programs to improve the lives of individuals and families in Morris County.

“COVID-19 has had an unprecedented impact on the region, state and nation and resulted in massive unemployment and also additional challenges for those who already were struggling,” notes CCM President Anthony J. Iacono. “As the community’s college, we are honored to partner with Table of Hope and others to assist Morris County residents. I am so proud to be part of this county where people pull together to help one another.”

Flyer for the free distribution of food at CCM on June 23, 2020.
Flyer for the free distribution of food at CCM on June 23, 2020.

Assisting with the event are Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, a CCM graduate, the Morris County Board of Chosen Freeholders, the Morris County Chamber of Commerce, Alstede Farms and approximately 40 volunteers, including numerous CCM employees. The Morris County Council of Education Associations also contributed $5,000 to purchase food for the event.

“This is a powerful testament of the heart of the Morris County community,” says Williams.

“The great work being done by Table of Hope and other food pantries in Morris County has been exemplary,” says Freeholder Kathy DeFillippo, liaison to the county’s Human Services agencies. “Without their dedication during this public health crisis, many people in our county, who have lost their jobs due to COVID-19, would be hard pressed to feed their families. We thank Table of Hope and strongly support these organizations.”

“Table of Hope, the Interfaith Food Pantry, the Community Food Bank, Alstede Farms and other charitable organizations have stepped up at a time when the lives of many families were upended by the COVID 19 healthcare crisis,” say Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon. “Their work reflects the finest qualities in people who care about their neighbors and the well-being of others during grim times. Table of Hope Mobile Food Pantry and CCM, for hosting this event, have all my gratitude and admiration.”

In March, Table of Hope began operating weekly mobile food distribution programs in Morristown, Parsippany and Dover, along with additional grocery supply events in other Morris County communities. Prior to COVID-19, its pantry in Morristown served about 65 people weekly. The number now being served each week at each mobile distribution event averages 500 to 600, reports Teresa Williams, executive director of the Spring Street Community Development Center. To date, more than 9,000 individuals and families have been helped and more than 220 tons of food has been distributed.

Table of Hope also operates a soup kitchen that during the pandemic has continued to provide dinners as a take-out service.  Table of Hope receives food from the Community Food Bank of New Jersey in Hillside, local farms and food service companies. To volunteer or make a donation, visit the Spring Street CDC website at https://springstreetcdc.org/.

Along with Table of Hope, numerous other services are available to assist residents in Morris County’s 39 municipalities who are in need of food. A list of available food services, including food pantries, volunteer shopper organizations, meal delivery services and take-out meal services, can be found at https://hs.morriscountynj.gov/food-services/.