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Five Morris County Correctional Facility Inmates Graduate Rigorous Food Handling Course Through Aramark Corp.’s In2Work Program

Five inmates at the Morris County Correctional Facility graduated Friday, October 18, from an intensive four-week food handling course, the result of the first collaboration between Aramark Corporation and a county correctional facility in New Jersey.

Morris County Correctional Facility Educator Gradie Carroll-Struble congratulates  an inmate on successfully passing an intensive food handling course.
Morris County Correctional Facility Educator Gradie Carroll-Struble congratulates an inmate on successfully passing an intensive food handling course.

The graduates – three men and two women – excelled in the 40-hour class, earning both Aramark In2Work certificates of completion in kitchen basics, and certificates of ServSafe Food Handler Training.

ServSafe is a food and beverage safety training and certificate program administered by the National Restaurant Association and required by most restaurants as a basic credential for their staff.

Furthering the elation of the graduates was the commitment by the County College of Morris (CCM) to give them college credit for completing the course and a waiver of the college application fee if they wish to pursue further certifications or an associate’s degree in one of three culinary and hospitality-related programs at CCM.

Representatives of Aramark Corp. and County College of Morris and Morris County Correctional Facility Officers at the graduation of five inmates from a food handling course.,
Representatives of Aramark Corp. and County College of Morris and Morris County Correctional Facility Officers at the graduation of five inmates from a food handling course.

One female inmate emotionally said at the ceremony: “I just can’t believe you guys did this for us.”

The course involved a collaboration between the Correctional Facility, Aramark and representatives of its In2Work program, and CCM, while underscoring the Morris County Sheriff’s Office’s philosophy that recidivism is lowered when inmates are assisted in making healthier and wiser choices about their lives.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon told the inmates that they displayed positive qualities that made them perfect candidates for the program.

“They saw something in you that made them pluck you out of the population. I think that’s significant,” the Sheriff said. He said he believes in programs that are “not a hand-out but a hand-up” and help people move on to successful lives.

The course was taught by Correctional Facility Educator Gradie Carroll-Struble and Anwar Bryant, Food Service Director for Aramark Corporation, which is the food provider to the Correctional Facility.

Correctional Facility administrative staff, including Undersheriff Alan J. Robinson, Warden Christopher Klein, Captain Robert McCaffrey and Correctional Facility Chaplain Rev. Herman Scott were at the graduation ceremony, along with Aramark representatives Stacy Langin and Audwin Hutson, and Patrick Enright, CCM Vice President of Professional Studies and Applied Sciences.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon chats with a Morris County Correctional Facility inmate who passed an intensive food handling course at the facility.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon chats with a Morris County Correctional Facility inmate who passed an intensive food handling course at the facility.

Educator Carroll and Director Bryant passed out the certificates to the graduates and then tied honorary aprons around their waists before the graduates were treated to a celebratory cake. CCM Vice President Enright told the group that they already have started their college careers if they choose with the credit the course gave them.

One male inmate who will soon be released gave a speech that expressed his gratitude for the opportunity that he believes has increased his chances for solid employment.

“Facilities that provide these programs give individuals incentive to maintain a positive and healthy attitude,” he said.

Aramark Regional Vice President Stacy Langin said she hopes completion of the program will give the inmates a fresh start upon release.

“My greatest hope is that it helps with mindset and moving from language like ‘I hope’ to ‘I will,’ or ‘If I,’ and changing that to ‘When I,’” she said.

“We are more than invested in seeing all of you be successful and growing your careers, growing your families, growing your lives and giving back,” she said.

Aramark, a food service, facilities and uniform provider, funds scholarships and has a job placement portal that the inmates upon release can access to try to obtain job in the food services industry.  Aramark is a food service provider in about 600 Correctional Facilities across the United States and hopes to bring the kitchen basics and ServSafe course to all county Correctional Facilities in New Jersey.

Morris County Sheriff’s Office Awaits Prized Re-accreditation Of Its Bureau of Law Enforcement

The Morris County Sheriff’s Office welcomes an upcoming, four-day onsite visit by an assessment team that will study policies, operations and support services to determine whether prestigious re-accreditation should be awarded to the Bureau of Law Enforcement.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon in his office in Morristown.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon in his office in Morristown.

The assessors – all law enforcement professionals from other accredited agencies – will be at the Morris County Courthouse from Monday, October 21, through Thursday, October 24, to peruse records, talk to as many Sheriff’s Office employees as possible, and observe how Sheriff’s Officers perform their duties in the courtroom and corridors.

Morris County Sheriff’s Office Detective Captain Denise Thornton, the agency’s Accreditation Manager, on Tuesday briefed Sheriff James M. Gannon, Chief Sheriff’s Officer Kelley Zienowicz, Chief Warrant Officer Richard Rose, and other administrative staff on what to expect from the final stage of the re-accreditation process.

Administered by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc. (CALEA), the four-year accreditation program requires agencies to comply with standards in four areas: policy and procedures, administration, operations, and support services. Prior to the on-site visit, Detective Captain Thornton and other staff have spent the past four years meeting web-based prongs of the accreditation process that positioned the agency for the site-based assessment.

From left, Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, Chief Sheriff's Officer Kelley Zienowicz and Chief Warrant Officer Richard Rose listen to briefing by Agency Accreditation Manager Detective Captain Denise Thornton.
From left, Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, Chief Sheriff’s Officer Kelley Zienowicz and Chief Warrant Officer Richard Rose listen to briefing by Agency Accreditation Manager Detective Captain Denise Thornton.

The Morris County Sheriff’s Office was first accredited in March of 1998 when the agency was found to be in compliance with 337 standards.  The agency has achieved reaccreditation five times since then.

The onsite team also may request to visit and observe Special Services of the Morris County Sheriff’s Office, including Crime Scene Investigation (CSI), K-9 and Bomb Squad.

The team will speak to representatives of other law enforcement agencies and groups with whom the Sheriff’s Office has developed partnerships or forged strong outreach relationships, including the Morris County Police Chiefs Association, members of the Jewish Chabad Community and the LGBTQ Community.

The team also will focus on Sheriff’s Office Community Outreach and Planning (COPS) activities, including the Hope One mobile substance use recovery and resource program, and components of the Sheriff’s Responsible School Violence Prevention, Preparation, Protection (RSVP-3) program.  RSVP-3 has three branches: a mobile app through which students can anonymously report threats to school safety; active shooter training; and Behavioral Threat Assessment Management (BTAM) curriculum and training to ensure police, schools and mental health professionals are in sync on behaviors that pose risks to school security.

Morris County Sheriff's Office Accreditation Manager Detective Captain Denise Thornton briefs Sheriff James M. Gannon and colleagues on the Accreditation process.
Morris County Sheriff’s Office Accreditation Manager Detective Captain Denise Thornton briefs Sheriff James M. Gannon and colleagues on the Accreditation process.

The public is an integral part of the accreditation process.

Agency employees and members of the community are invited to offer comments at a public information session on October 22, 2019 at 3 pm. The session will be conducted in the Freeholder Public Meeting Room located on the Fifth Floor of the County of Morris Administration & Records Building, 10 Court Street, Morristown, New Jersey, 07960.

Agency employees and the public are also invited to offer comments by calling 973-285-6053 on October 22, 2019 between the hours of 10 am and 12 pm. Comments will be taken by the Assessment Team. Telephone comments as well as appearances at the public information session are limited to 10 minutes and must address the agency’s ability to comply with CALEA’s standards.

A copy of the Standards is available at the main Sheriff’s Office located in the Morris County Courthouse, 56 Washington Street, Morristown, New Jersey, 07960.  Local contact is Accreditation Manager Detective/Captain Denise Thornton at 973-285-6675.

Anyone wishing to submit written comments about the Morris County Sheriff’s Office’s ability to comply with the standards for accreditation may send them to the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement, Inc. (CALEA), 13575 Heathcote Boulevard, Suite 320, Gainesville, Virginia, 20155 or email [email protected]

 

 

LET THE MORRIS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE KNOW YOUR THOUGHTS ON HOW IT’S DOING

PUBLIC NOTICE:

The Morris County Sheriff’s Office is scheduled for a site-based assessment as part of a program to achieve accreditation by verifying it meets professional standards.

Administered by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc. (CALEA®), the accreditation program requires agencies to comply with state-of-the-art standards in four basic areas: policy and procedures, administration, operations, and support services.

As part of the assessment, agency employees and members of the community are invited to offer comments at a public information session on October 22, 2019 at 3 pm. The session will be conducted in the Freeholder Public Meeting Room located on the Fifth Floor of the County of Morris Administration & Records Building, 10 Court Street, Morristown, New Jersey, 07960.

LET THE MORRIS COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE KNOW YOUR THOUGHTS ON HOW IT'S DOING

Agency employees and the public are also invited to offer comments by calling 973-285-6053 on October 22, 2019 between the hours of 10 am and 12 pm. Comments will be taken by the Assessment Team.

Telephone comments as well as appearances at the public information session are limited to 10 minutes and must address the agency’s ability to comply with CALEA’s standards. A copy of the Standards is available at the main Sheriff’s Office located in the Morris County Courthouse, 56 Washington Street, Morristown, New Jersey, 07960.  Local contact is Accreditation Manager Detective/Captain Denise Thornton at 973-285-6675.

Anyone wishing to submit written comments about the Morris County Sheriff’s Office’s ability to comply with the standards for accreditation may send them to the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement, Inc. (CALEA), 13575 Heathcote Boulevard, Suite 320, Gainesville, Virginia, 20155 or email [email protected]