Long Valley Couple Will Donate $10 for Every Person Who Receives Narcan Training on July 13 by the Morris County Sheriff’s Office Hope One Team

A Long Valley couple who created the non-profit advocacy organization “Joshua’s Peace” in memory of their beloved son who died by an accidental overdose have volunteered to donate $10 to the Long Valley Food Pantry and the Long Valley Community Assistance Program for every resident who completes Narcan training on July 13 provided by the Morris County Sheriff’s Office Hope One team.

Maria and Mark Broadhurst of Long Valley, NJ, received Narcan training in February 2020 by Caroline Bailey, a Certified Peer Recovery Specialist for CARES and Morris County Sheriff's Office Hope One partner.
Maria and Mark Broadhurst of Long Valley, NJ, received Narcan training in February 2020 by Caroline Bailey, a Certified Peer Recovery Specialist for CARES and Morris County Sheriff’s Office Hope One partner.

Morris County Sheriff’s Office Corporal Erica Valvano, coordinator of the Hope One mobile substance use and mental health disorder outreach program, will be with a Hope One team on Monday, July 13, outside the Long Valley Pharmacy at 62 E. Mill Road, Long Valley, Washington Township, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The team includes a Certified Peer Recovery Specialist from the Rockaway-based Center for Addiction Recovery, Education & Success (CARES), and a mental health specialist from the Mental Health Association of Essex and Morris.

Mark and Maria Broadhurst, whose 24-year-old son, Joshua Broadhurst, died by an overdose on December 6, 2019, will be at the Long Valley Pharmacy and have pledged to donate $10 for every resident who takes the Hope One team’s free, 20-minute tutorial on how to administer Narcan to reverse an opioid-induced overdose.  People who take the training also receive a free Narcan kit.

The Morris County Sheriff's Office Hope One vehicle on the Morristown Green on July 6, 2020.
The Morris County Sheriff’s Office Hope One vehicle on the Morristown Green on July 6, 2020.

Shortly after their son died, the Broadhursts — the parents of five children — started “Joshua’s Peace” with the purpose of investing in organizations, services and people who make a difference by educating, advocating and innovating in the areas of prevention, treatment and recovery.

A Hope One team with Mark and Maria Broadhurst in Dover in February 2020. From left, Mental Health Advocate Al Shurdom, Maria Broadhurst, Mark Broadhurst, Certified Peer Recovery Specialist Caroline Bailey, Morris County Sheriff's Office Corporal Erica Valvano and Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon.
A Hope One team with Mark and Maria Broadhurst in Dover in February 2020. From left, Mental Health Advocate Al Shurdom, Maria Broadhurst, Mark Broadhurst, Certified Peer Recovery Specialist Caroline Bailey, Morris County Sheriff’s Office Corporal Erica Valvano and Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon.

The Broadhursts visited Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon and the Hope One team on February 28 during the team’s stop outside Trinity Lutheran Church in Dover, where Faith Kitchen, a community soup kitchen is based.  The Broadhursts on that day underwent the Narcan training conducted by Certified Peer Recovery Specialist Caroline Bailey.

The Broadhursts started “Joshua’s Peace” to honor their son, “shed a loving light on the disease of addiction,” and spread the fact that addiction does not discriminate.  Their son, who loved his family, nutrition, body-building and the beach, had been sober for four years before he relapsed and overdosed on heroin laced with fentanyl.

Hope One was launched on April 3, 2017, and has significantly impacted the community by making more than 11,815 contacts with individuals.  The non-judgmental team has trained at least 2,479 people on how to administer Narcan, assisted 171 people into rehab and recovery programs and another 140 people with mental health services.

Joshua’s Peace website can be found at www.joshuaspeace.org