Morris County Sheriff’s Office Detective, K-9 Partner and Boonton Township Police Successfully Resolve Suspect Search Through A Surrender

Morris County Sheriff’s Office Detective Marc Adamsky and his K-9 partner Tim succeeded in getting a suspect to surrender inside a vacant home in Boonton Township after searching for her for nearly six hours with the assistance of township police.

Boonton Township Police Chief Michael Danyo, Morris County Sheriff's Office K-9 Section Detective Marc Adamsky with K-9 Tim and Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon
Boonton Township Police Chief Michael Danyo, Morris County Sheriff’s Office K-9 Section Detective Marc Adamsky with K-9 Tim and Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon

“I commend Detective Adamsky and his partner Tim for their professional and tenacious search that ended in the best way possible – with the suspect’s surrender after commands from the Detective who did not have to release K-9 Tim,” Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon said.

The Morris County Sheriff’s Office K-9 Section is a shared service that provides all 39 Morris County municipalities with expert teams that find missing people of all ages, suspects, narcotics, explosives and indications of arson.

“Our Officers work tirelessly each and every day to help ensure the safety of all of our residents here in Boonton Township. We are extremely fortunate to have such a great working relationship with the Morris County Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff’s office is truly a first-class organization, and their assistance on July 21st helped ensure a positive and safe resolution to an otherwise very dangerous situation,” Boonton Township Police Chief Michael Danyo said.

Morris County Sheriff's Office Detective Marc Adamsky with K-9 Partner Tim.
Morris County Sheriff’s Office Detective Marc Adamsky with K-9 Partner Tim.

Detective Adamsky and K-9 Tim, a 3-year-old Dutch Shepherd, responded to a call for assistance from Boonton Township Police on July 21 at 3:49 a.m. and was at the scene by 4:30 a.m.

Morris County Sheriff’s Office K-9 Section Detectives Mike Carbone and David Marshall, with their respective K-9 partners Loco and Ollie, also responded to assist with the search.

A vehicle pursuit that began in a neighboring municipality had extended into Boonton Township and momentarily ended when the driver of a Jeep carrying three passengers crashed at the intersection of North Main Street and Powerville Road around 3:45 a.m.

A female fled from the Jeep after the non-fatal crash and immediately became the focus of the search to which Detective Adamsky and K-9 Tim were called.  Meanwhile, the Jeep that had crashed left the scene and its three occupants were quickly apprehended in Denville Township.

Boonton Township Sgt. Thomas Cacciabeve said the search for the woman – later identified as Sheironda Geffrard, 20, of Orange, N.J. – ended peacefully through a combination of Detective Adamsky and Tim’s doggedness and witness reports.

The Morris County Office of Emergency Management also released a drone to assist in the search.

Front row: Boonton Township Police Sgt. Tom Cacciabeve and Officer Jody Becker.  In back, Boonton Township Police Chief Michael Danyo, Morris County Sheriff's Office Detective Marc Adamsky with K-9 Partner Tim, and Boonton Township Lieutenant Andrew Tintle.
Front row: Boonton Township Police Sgt. Tom Cacciabeve and Officer Jody Becker. In back, Boonton Township Police Chief Michael Danyo, Morris County Sheriff’s Office Detective Marc Adamsky with K-9 Partner Tim, and Boonton Township Lieutenant Andrew Tintle.

The K-9 team of Detective Adamsky and Tim searched for the woman from the scene of the crash onto North Main Street and Powerville Road, with the assistance of Detectives Carbone and Marshall. Detective Adamsky and Tim remained in the township while police developed leads and ultimately found the woman at 10:34 a.m. inside a vacant house on North Main Street, about a half-mile from the crash site.

Detective Adamsky gave the woman verbal commands to surrender over his vehicle public address system and warned that K-9 Tim would be released if she did not comply.  The suspect obeyed the caution and emerged from the house onto a rear porch where she was arrested.  She currently is charged with burglary.

K-9 Tim is certified in both narcotics detection and patrol, which encompasses obedience, tracking, evidence recovery and criminal apprehension.

A criminal complaint is merely an accusation. Despite the accusation, the defendant is presumed innocent unless, or until, they are proven guilty in court.

 

 

 

 

Morris County Correctional Facility Inmates Will Soon Be Able to Connect With Relatives Through Virtual Visits While COVID-19 Restrictions Continue

     Inmates at the Morris County Correctional Facility who haven’t received visits in more than four months because of COVID-19 restrictions will soon be able to connect with family and friends through wireless tablets.

The Correctional Facility, which is run by the Morris County Sheriff’s Office and houses inmates from both Morris and Sussex counties, was provided at least 85 Android tablets by GTL, a leader in technology and wireless solutions for correctional facilities.

From left, Morris County Sheriff's Office Corrections Lieutenant Michael Schweizer, Corrections Sergeant Raymond Dykstra and Corrections Sergeant Shawn Johnston with a tablet, one of more than 75 that Morris County Correctional Facility inmates will be able to access to have virtual visits with relatives and friends.
From left, Morris County Sheriff’s Office Corrections Lieutenant Michael Schweizer, Corrections Sergeant Raymond Dykstra and Corrections Sergeant Shawn Johnston with a tablet, one of more than 75 that Morris County Correctional Facility inmates will be able to access to have virtual visits with relatives and friends.

Although inmates can telephone relatives and friends, the Correctional Facility on March 16 temporarily suspended in-person inmate visits with family to minimize the spread of COVID-19.  The restriction currently remains in effect and has dispirited some inmates, Morris County Correctional Facility Warden Christopher Klein said.

Warden Klein noted that the tablets do not cost taxpayers any money. The cost of the tablet visit time spent by inmates is withdrawn from their commissary accounts by GTL. Inmates who lack funds will be allotted $3.75 a week from a special inmate welfare fund to engage in a 15-minute virtual visit with relatives.

“In these trying times it’s very beneficial for inmates to have supportive contact with family,” Warden Klein said.

“At no cost to taxpayers, this program will allow inmates important contact with caring relatives who can help ease stress and isolation the inmates may feel,” Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon said.

Beyond virtual visits, the tablets also can be used to access approved educational and entertainment materials and in-house request forms. When visitation restrictions are lifted, inmates may also use the tablets to virtually visit with relatives and friends who live out-of-state or cannot make in-person visits to the Correctional Facility.

Morris County Correctional Facility in Morris Township, NJ
Morris County Correctional Facility in Morris Township, NJ

Correctional Facility Lieutenant Michael Schweizer and Sergeants Raymond Dykstra and Shawn Johnston have been spear-heading the tablet project and working with GTL on fine-tuning operational aspects.

Multiple safeguards are in place for use of the tablets:

  • They run on GTL’s network security, a full-featured security access control software;
  • Virtual visits can only be initiated by family and friends outside the facility;
  • The tablet cameras used for virtual visits are operational only in secure visiting booths and not from within inmate cells;
  • Features that could present potential security risks have been removed and inmates have no access to core device settings other than volume, rotation and brightness control.

Virtual visits will be allowed on the same days and times that in-person visits were permitted before the suspension. Use of the tablets for educational or entertainment purposes can occur whenever inmates are not locked in their cells at specific times.

Regardless of the criminal charges they face, all inmates will have access to the tablets as long as they are in compliance with Correctional Facility rules.

Family and friends who wish to make virtual visits with an inmate at the Morris County Correctional Facility can go to www.gettingout.com/create-account to create an account to access the video visitation.  Once the account is set up, funds can be deposited at www.gettingout.com/deposit-funds.

 

Morris County Sheriff’s Office Welcomes New Officers Tyler Bartol and Michael Smith

Two new Morris County Sheriff’s Officers whose Basic Police Training Class was interrupted for 10 weeks during the COVID-19 pandemic were officially sworn in to their positions Monday, July 20, by Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon.

Newly-sworn Morris County Sheriff's Officers Tyler Bartol and Michael Smith
Newly-sworn Morris County Sheriff’s Officers Tyler Bartol and Michael Smith

Tyler Bartol of Roxbury and Michael Smith of Jefferson took the oath of office surrounded by family in the Historic Courtroom of the Morris County Courthouse after graduating the 94th Basic Police Training Class at the Morris County Public Safety Training Academy on July 16.

Sheriff Gannon, who was joined at the swearing-in by agency Command Staff, noted that an official graduation ceremony did not occur at the Academy because of the ongoing healthcare crisis.  Sheriff’s Officers Bartol and Smith are beginning their careers at a particularly challenging time, the Sheriff said, with COVID-19, broad economic fluctuations, protests and civil unrest in parts of the country.

Morris County Sheriff's Officer Tyler Bartol is sworn in to the position on July 20, 2020 by Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon.
Morris County Sheriff’s Officer Tyler Bartol is sworn in to the position on July 20, 2020 by Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon.

The Officers, among 38 graduates, started the Basic Police Training Class on January 13.  The class was put on hold on March 19 and recruits were allowed to return on June 1, more than two months later. During the unexpected class break, Officers Bartol and Smith were among the recruits who assisted the Morris County Office of Emergency Management with tasks related to operation of the Morris County COVID-19 Drive-Thru test site on the County College of Morris campus in Randolph Township.

“I know you’ve gotten here against all odds,” Sheriff Gannon said. “You’ve joined a great family in law enforcement. So, make a difference.  Make THE difference.”

“I think there are good things on the horizon but these are challenging times,” the Sheriff said. He urged family members to support the new Officers, who may not always be able to celebrate holidays or festivities because of work duties. The Sheriff said that he, in turn, will always be supportive of the Officers.

Morris County Sheriff's Officer Michael Smith is sworn in to the position on July 20, 2020 by Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon.
Morris County Sheriff’s Officer Michael Smith is sworn in to the position on July 20, 2020 by Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon.

Officers Bartol and Smith are assigned to the Protective Services Division, which is responsible for protection of judges and security in and around the Morris County Courthouse complex. Between March 30 and June 26, many of the Officers assigned to PSD were reassigned to security and traffic control at the Morris County COVID-19 test site, and transporting samples to a laboratory.

Officer Bartol is a Roxbury High School graduate who attended County College of Morris and earned a bachelor of science degree in criminal justice from Rutgers University.  He was hired by the Morris County Sheriff’s Office after working as a dispatcher for the Morris County Communications Center.

Officer Smith is a graduate of Jefferson High School who attended County College of Morris then Moravian College, where he earned a bachelor of arts degree in sociology/law and society.

Newly sworn Morris County Sheriff's Officers Tyler Bartol and Michael Smith with Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon and command staff.
Newly sworn Morris County Sheriff’s Officers Tyler Bartol and Michael Smith with Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon and command staff.

A college lacrosse player, Officer Smith coaches high school lacrosse and worked in the construction field before being hired by the Sheriff’s Office.

Officer Bartol was joined at the swearing-in by his parents, Laura and Geoff Bartol, and brothers Trevor and Ryan.  His uncle, John McGuinness, is a retired Morris Township Police Chief.

Officer Smith was joined by his parents, Michael and Jill Smith, his sister Justina Smith, his grandmother, Kathleen Van Orden, and his girlfriend, Dana Monte.