Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon Presents On RSVP-3 School Safety Program at National Sheriffs’ Association Conference

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, R, with Pinal County, Arizona Sheriff Mark Lamb, star of reality show "Live PD."
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, R, with Pinal County, Arizona Sheriff Mark Lamb, star of reality show “Live PD.”

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, who now is serving a two-year post as president of the Sheriffs’ Association of New Jersey, gave a presentation at the National Sheriffs’ Association 2020 Winter Conference on his RSVP-3 school safety program and a threat-reporting app he launched in 2019.

Sheriff Gannon represented New Jersey’s 21 Sheriffs at the national conference in Washington, D.C., that brought together law enforcement leaders to collaborate and brainstorm on emerging and evolving issues from the legalization of marijuana to cyber-attacks on Sheriff’s Offices.

Sheriff Gannon, who was joined at the convention by other New Jersey attendees and Sheriffs’ Association of New Jersey Executive Director John Armeno, also met a reality television celebrity at the convention: Pinal County, Arizona Sheriff Mark Lamb, the star of the A&E Network’s “Live PD.”

Sheriff Gannon attended the Department of Homeland Security Leadership Academy on Sunday and on Monday, during a Committee of State Sheriffs’ Associations meeting, he presented on one of his Agency’s hallmark programs – the multi-faceted Responsible School Violence Prevention, Preparation, Protection, also known as RSVP-3.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon with Rick Smith, CEO and founder of Axon Enterprise Inc. and author of "The End of Killing."
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon with Rick Smith, CEO and founder of Axon Enterprise Inc. and author of “The End of Killing.”

Rick Smith, CEO and founder of Axon Enterprise, Inc., and the author of “The End of Killing,” as well as United States Attorney General William P. Barr, addressed the committee on Monday.

Sheriff Gannon presented on the RSVP-3 app, which allows students or anyone to anonymously report threats to school safety and behavior that could turn deadly in school corridors. Tips to the app, which has received about $23,500 in funding through the Morris County Sheriff’s Office CrimeStoppers program, is monitored in real time, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, by law enforcement professionals working with school officials.

Sheriff Gannon also described for the committee how the RSVP-3 program has invested in Behavioral Threat Assessment & Management (B-TAM) curriculum, developed by Sigma Threat Management Associates and taught to at least 300 school leaders, mental health experts and police in Morris County so they can evaluate and respond to school threats in a scientifically-reliable manner.

“It’s been enlightening and valuable getting to know how Sheriffs across the United States approach issues in their communities and communicate with other law enforcement partners. Our jurisdictions may differ geographically and demographically but we share many common concerns, particularly as peace keepers under the law,” Sheriff Gannon said.