Sole Female Morris County Corrections Officer Graduates 19th Basic Course For County Corrections Officers

Morris County Sheriff’s Office Bureau of Corrections Officer Camille Mastroeni on Monday graduated the demanding, 11-week-long 19th Basic Course for County Corrections Officers, the only woman in the class to successfully finish.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, Corrections Officer Camille Mastroeni, Morris County Bureau of Corrections Undersheriff Alan J. Robinson, Bureau of Corrections Captain Robert McCaffrey.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, Corrections Officer Camille Mastroeni, Morris County Bureau of Corrections Undersheriff Alan J. Robinson, Bureau of Corrections Captain Robert McCaffrey.

Officer Mastroeni, who is married to Boonton Police Officer Joseph Bolcar, who is currently deployed with the United States Army National Guard, also is the sole graduating Officer to work for the Morris County Correctional Facility.

Officer Mastroeni ranked second in her class in firearms proficiency.

The 19th Basic Course started with 31 recruits but only 16 completed the rigorous course of academics, physical fitness and firearms training.  Fourteen graduates work for Hudson County Corrections and one Officer is employed by the Passaic County Sheriff’s Office.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon was the keynote speaker and passed out course certificates to the graduates as their families and friends applauded and cheered in the auditorium of the Morris County Public Safety Training Academy.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon and newly-graduated Corrections Officer Camille Mastroeni surrounded by Bureau of Corrections Officers.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon and newly-graduated Corrections Officer Camille Mastroeni surrounded by Bureau of Corrections Officers.

The course is run by Academy Director Daniel Colucci and the Morris County Department of Law and Public Safety. Of 64 classes in firearms training, defensive tactics, fire training, first aid/CPR, physical training and academics, 57 of them were taught by Morris County Sheriff’s Office Bureau of Corrections Officers.

“I would suggest these Officers walk the toughest beat in America,” Sheriff Gannon said in his remarks.

He said the Corrections profession is increasingly seeing more inmates with mental health disorders.

“It is not an easy job and it is one that requires intelligence, tact, diplomacy, sensitivity, restraint, hard work and a lot of common sense in dealing with some of the more difficult persons in society, and which this training at the Academy helped prepare you to do,” Sheriff Gannon said.

He noted that familial support is essential for a Corrections Officer to flourish and said Officers at the Morris County Correctional Facility treat each other like family.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon and newly-graduated Corrections Officer Camille Mastroeni surrounded by Bureau of Corrections Officers.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon congratulates Corrections Officer Camille Mastroeni.

Officer Mastroeni, whose sister, parents and grandparents were present for her graduation, said she gritted her teeth and survived the extensive curriculum, frequent tests, and physical fitness regimen.

“My challenge was pushups. You have to have perfect form,” she said.

Correctional Facility Superior Officers were present for the graduation, including Undersheriff Alan J. Robinson and Warden Christopher Klein.  The graduates were escorted into the Academy auditorium by the Sheriff’s Office Honor Guard and bagpipers.

Besides Officer Mastroeni, the graduates are: Luis A. Arroyo, William N. Arroyo, Julio Aybar Jr., Cesar Beltran, William S. Borke IV, Gilberto delRisco, David A. Houghton, Frank Madrid, Marko Nakhla, Deuny Pena, Desmen Richardson, Roger Ruiz, Gregory Russell, Rashon Tyson-Butler, and James Ventre.