Morris County Correctional Facility Found 100 Percent Compliant With Standards During New Jersey Department of Corrections Inspection

The Morris County Correctional Facility was found to be 100 percent compliant with 270 mandated state standards during a recent five-day surprise inspection of the facility overseen by Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon.

Morris County Corrections Officer Mike Chereches, who oversees inspections and accreditation at the Morris County Correctional Facility, with Correctional Facility Warden Christopher Klein.
Morris County Corrections Officer Mike Chereches, who oversees inspections and accreditation at the Morris County Correctional Facility, with Correctional Facility Warden Christopher Klein.

Darcella Patterson Sessomes, Assistant Commissioner of the Division of Programs and Community Services within the New Jersey  Department of Corrections, alerted Morris County Correctional Facility Warden Christopher Klein by letter that the facility fully passed an inspection that pertains to the year 2018, though it was conducted from October 7 through October 11, 2019.

“You and your staff are congratulated on this achievement and are to be commended for the efforts made in preparation for this inspection.  The hard work and dedication by the staff of your facility was evident to the members of the inspection team and certainly deserves special recognition,” Assistant Commissioner Sessomes wrote.

The Correctional Facility is run by the Morris County Sheriff’s Office Bureau of Corrections, one of two Bureaus in the Agency. Corrections Officer Mike Chereches oversees the annual inspection by the New Jersey Department of Corrections and maintains a detailed power-point presentation that assists the inspectors in determining compliance.

The inspection – which facility Officers anticipated without knowing precisely when it would occur – included a tour of the 19-year-old facility, interviews with Officers, civilian staff and inmates, and examination of policies and procedures that detail the finest points – even light wattage and screw sizes used in plumbing fixtures.

Morris County Correctional Facility off John Street in Morris Township.
Morris County Correctional Facility off John Street in Morris Township.

The inspection, conducted to determine compliance with the requirements of New Jersey Administrative Code Title 10A:31, covered all aspects of maintaining a secure facility for adult inmates, including: planning and design, emergency procedures, security and control, personnel, access to courts, protective custody, visits, inmate clothing and hygienic living, medical and dental health services, and all other facility components.

“I am very proud of the vigilance of Officers and staff at the Correctional Facility who ensure, every single day, that the facility is secure and spotless and that inmates are guaranteed humane, lawful and safe treatment,” Sheriff Gannon said.

The Correctional Facility, which opened on May 25, 2000, is a six-story building of 157,478-square-feet of space.  The structure includes eight housing pods totaling 277 cells with a maximum capacity of 524 inmates.  There is a full-service kitchen, laundry, administrative offices, K9 kennels, intake/processing area, staff training room, religious, educational and exercise facilities and a medical and nursing unit.

The average daily population for inspection year 2018 was 191 men and 30 females.   In 2019, the Morris County Sheriff’s Office reached a shared services agreement with the Sussex County Sheriff’s Office under which Sussex County inmates are housed in Morris County at a cost to Sussex County of $105 per day per inmate.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon speaks with an inmate at a recent function at the Correctional Facility.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon speaks with an inmate at a recent function at the Correctional Facility.

Currently, there are 225 inmates in the Morris County Correctional Facility; 153 are housed on Morris County charges and 72 are housed on Sussex County charges.

The Morris County Correctional Facility has gone beyond the mandated state inspection requirements by voluntarily undergoing accreditation processes by private, non-profit accrediting groups.

The facility in January 2019 was accredited for a sixth consecutive time by the American Correctional Association, mastering standards for jails on nutrition, security, cleanliness and quality of life.

The facility also is accredited by the National Commission on Correctional Health Care.

 

 

Global Spotlight on Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon and Hope One With International Association of Chiefs of Police Award

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon and founding partners in the Hope One mobile substance use recovery program tonight, October 29, received an esteemed award for their public-private venture from the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the largest professional association of police leaders in the world.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon with 2019 International Association of Chiefs of Police President Paul M. Cell.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon with 2019 International Association of Chiefs of Police President Paul M. Cell.

On behalf of Hope One, Sheriff Gannon accepted the 2019 IACP/Security Industry Association Michael Shanahan Leadership in Public/Private Cooperation Award on October 29, at the IACP’s Annual Banquet in Chicago, Illinois, from 2019 IACP President Paul M. Cell, the Montclair State University Police Chief.

“Hope One was based on a simple concept of treatment providers and specialists bringing critical recovery and resource services directly to people who may be too exhausted, frightened or overwhelmed by addiction to seek help on their own. Hope One, with its steadfast, compassionate team, has saved lives and is committed to keep doing so,” Sheriff Gannon said.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, Madine Despeine-Udoh, Director of Self-Help, Advocacy and Education for the Mental Health Association of Essex and Morris, and Morris County Sheriff's Office Corporal Erica Valvano at the IACP Conference in Chicago on October 29.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, Madine Despeine-Udoh, Director of Self-Help, Advocacy and Education for the Mental Health Association of Essex and Morris, and Morris County Sheriff’s Office Corporal Erica Valvano at the IACP Conference in Chicago on October 29.

The Morris County Sheriff’s Office and its Hope One partners – the Rockaway-based Center for Addiction Recovery Education and Success (CARES), Daytop New Jersey, Prevention is Key (PIK) and the Mental Health Association of Essex and Morris – are the collective recipients of the award named in honor of retired University of Washington Police Department Chief Michael Shanahan.

The non-profit Family Promise of Morris County, which specializes in finding emergency and permanent housing for homeless individuals and families, came aboard Hope One after its launch to make sure clients had essential toiletries and assistance in finding housing.

The award bestowed by the Security Industry Association and IACP, a global organization that prepares the next generation for the future of law enforcement, recognizes outstanding achievements in the development and implementation of public/private partnerships to promote public safety.

Global recognition at the annual International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) convention in Chicago, Ill., for the Morris County Sheriff's Office Hope One program.
Global recognition at the annual International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) convention in Chicago, Ill., for the Morris County Sheriff’s Office Hope One program.

Sheriff Gannon was joined at the IACP Annual Banquet – the culmination of the 2019 IACP Annual Conference and Exposition – by Morris County Sheriff’s Office Bureau of Law Enforcement Undersheriff Mark Spitzer, Sheriff’s Office Corporal Erica Valvano, the coordinator of Hope One, and Madine Despeine-Udoh, the Director of Self Help, Advocacy and Education for the Mental Health Association of Essex and Morris.

Corporal Valvano and Director Despeine-Udoh are core Hope One professionals, along with Kelly LaBar, a Certified Peer Recovery Specialist from CARES.

Recognizing that opioid overdose deaths were reaching dire levels, Sheriff Gannon in January 2017 brought together law enforcement, substance use and mental health specialists for a solution.

The result, after just three months of planning and the formation of a partnership between law enforcement and non-profit agencies, was the launch of the Morris County Sheriff’s Office Hope One program on April 3, 2017.

Hope One is a mobile substance use recovery and resource outreach vehicle that was retrofitted out of a defunct SWAT vehicle.  With $15,000 from drug forfeiture funds, the vehicle was stripped of all law enforcement markings and painted white and purple, a color symbolizing recovery.  Its license plates read: Hope One.”

Leaders in the Morris County Sheriff's Office Hope One mobile resource and recovery program: Madine Despeine-Udoh, Director of Self-Help, Advocacy and Education for the Mental Health Association of Essex and Morris, and Morris County Sheriff's Office Corporal Erica Valvano.
Leaders in the Morris County Sheriff’s Office Hope One mobile resource and recovery program: Madine Despeine-Udoh, Director of Self-Help, Advocacy and Education for the Mental Health Association of Essex and Morris, and Morris County Sheriff’s Office Corporal Erica Valvano.

Hope One travels at least twice a week, and often on weekends, to locations in Morris County that are known for opioid overdoses, homeless encampments, community soup kitchens, and areas where at-risk populations are known to congregate.

With the help of the Morris County Sheriff’s Office and the Hope One staff, the city of Newark and counties of Burlington, Atlantic, Cape May and Monmouth have replicated Hope One and are on the road.

As of October 28, 2019, the Morris County Sheriff’s Office Hope One mobile program has logged 1,629 hours on the road in 356 stops.  The staff has had at least 9,516 contacts with individuals, trained 2,075 people in how to reverse an opioid overdose with Narcan, and assisted 154 people in getting into rehab and recovery programs and linked another 118 people with mental health services.

With a stigma-free approach and toiletries, snacks and beverages to put visitors at ease, the Hope One staff from the start has made a new contact every 10.8 minutes. Individuals who request Narcan training aboard Hope One are given a free Narcan kit to take home, and 38 people have returned the used kits to Hope One after using the Narcan to reverse an overdose.

“Hope One, led by Sheriff Jim Gannon and his team, is the best example of a best practice between criminal justice and the substance use disorders treatment and recovery communities,” said James Curtin, Chief Executive Officer of Daytop New Jersey.

“Daytop New Jersey is grateful to play a part in this tremendously effective effort to get persons desperately needing treatment – as opposed to incarceration – connected to life-saving treatment,” Mr. Curtin said.

CARES, a project of the non-profit Prevention Is Key (PIK), has provided the critical expertise of Peer Recovery Specialists and its access to treatment providers to greatly bolster the success of Hope One. As has the Mental Health Association of Essex and Morris since many people struggling with substance use disorders have a co-occurring mental health disorder.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon with International Association of Chiefs of Police 2019 President Paul M. Cell at the IACP annual convention in Chicago, Ill.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon with International Association of Chiefs of Police 2019 President Paul M. Cell at the IACP annual convention in Chicago, Ill.

“Hope One, under Sheriff Gannon’s leadership, has provided life-saving and life-changing services to the Morris County community. We are honored at the Mental Health Association to be a part of it,” said Robert Davison, the Association’s Chief Executive Officer.

Melody Runyon, Associate Director of PIK, said she sensed from the start that Hope One would be impactful.

“Prevention is Key and CARES are thrilled with the recognition by the International Association of Chiefs of Police of both the Hope One project and its collaborative partners,” Associate Director Runyon said.

“From the early planning days, when key stakeholders gathered at CARES to bring Hope One to life, we knew it would be something special.  Hope One began as an admirable vision to change the way we help people in Morris County,” Associate Director Runyon said.

“We wanted to bring services directly to those most in need and to reduce the stigma associated with the disease of addiction and mental health disorders.  I believe Hope One has surpassed what any of us had envisioned both within Morris County and the state of New Jersey,” she said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Belgian Malinois and Labrador Retriever Donated to Morris County Sheriff’s Office K-9 Section

The Morris County Sheriff’s Office K9 Section is adding talent to its kennel of police dogs through the courtesy of donations of a Labrador Retriever puppy and Belgian Malinois puppy to the Agency.

Morris County Sheriff's Office K9 Officer John Granato with an 8-week-old Labrador Retriever that is being donated to the Agency by onPOINT-K9 of Bernards Township.
Morris County Sheriff’s Office K9 Officer John Granato with an 8-week-old Labrador Retriever that is being donated to the Agency by onPOINT-K9 of Bernards Township.

And, the Sheriff’s Office wants the public to be part of naming these two fetching canines.  Please watch the Morris County Sheriff’s Office Facebook page for details of the contest. Fitting monikers will be chosen by Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon and K9 Section Detective Lieutenant Aaron Tomasini and Detective Corporal Michael McMahon.

An 8-week-old Labrador Retriever that will be trained by the Sheriff’s Office in explosives detection is being donated to the Sheriff’s Office by Walter Quense, founder and trainer of onPOINT-K9 in Bernards Township.

A 5-month-old Belgian Malinois female puppy, to be trained for search and rescue missions and accelerant detection, is being donated by Jeff Riccio, founder and trainer at Riptide K9 in Plymouth, Massachusetts. The Malinois is one of a litter of 11 pups.

Jeff Riccio, founder and trainer at Riptide K9 in Plymouth, Massachusetts, is donating this 5-month-old Belgian Malinois pup to the Morris County Sheriff's Office K9 Section.
Jeff Riccio, founder and trainer at Riptide K9 in Plymouth, Massachusetts, is donating this 5-month-old Belgian Malinois pup to the Morris County Sheriff’s Office K9 Section.

The donations – possible through Detective Corporal McMahon’s longtime professional associations with the trainers – will save Morris County about $12,000. Corporal McMahon already has conducted preliminary evaluations and testing of the puppies and believes they are fine additions to the K9 Section.

The Morris County Sheriff’s Office runs a premier training facility and the puppies will largely be trained onsite in their specialty areas with their handlers.   Sheriff’s Office Detective John Granato will handle the Labrador and Sheriff’s Office Detective Marc Adamsky will partner with the Malinois.

“We are donating because I have known Corporal McMahon for many years and always admired his passion and talent for training these dogs to do great things.  I believe he is on the cutting edge of training and heads up one of the most progressive training groups in the country,” said Jeff Riccio.

Corporal McMahon is scheduled to pick up the puppies next week and they have an appointment with a veterinarian – Dr. Kris Conway of Hodes Veterinary Group in Mine Hill – on November 6.

Walter Quense, founder and trainer of onPOINT-K9 in Bernards Township, is donating this 8-week-old Labrador Retriever to the Morris County Sheriff's Office K9 Section.
Walter Quense, founder and trainer of onPOINT-K9 in Bernards Township, is donating this 8-week-old Labrador Retriever to the Morris County Sheriff’s Office K9 Section.

Sheriff Gannon noted that the K9 Section, which provides services to all 39 municipalities in Morris County, is constantly busy responding to more than 1,000 calls annually that include patrols, searches for missing people, fires, narcotics investigations, and sweeps of public areas, festivals, concerts and large gatherings for explosive devices.

“The Sheriff’s Office appreciates these very generous donations that will keep the kennel of dogs fresh, energetic and highly trained as deployable law enforcement partners in keeping the community safe,” Sheriff Gannon said.

Once fully trained, the Malinois will replace K9 Cinders, an 8-year-old Belgian Malinois who will retire after partnering with Detective Granato.

The other dogs in the K9 Section are Po, Kai, Sigmund, Spike, Ollie, Chip, Tim, Loco and Boomer.

Angela Riccio with a 5-month-old Belgian Malinois pup that she and her husband Jeff Riccio, founder and trainer of Riptide K9 in Plymouth, Massachusetts, are donating to the Morris County Sheriff's Office K9 Section.
Angela Riccio with a 5-month-old Belgian Malinois pup that she and her husband Jeff Riccio, founder and trainer of Riptide K9 in Plymouth, Massachusetts, are donating to the Morris County Sheriff’s Office K9 Section.

The Sheriff’s Office rescued Boomer from a bleak future – possible euthanasia – in 2017 when a Sheriff’s Officer saw the frisky German shepherd and Labrador Retriever mixed breed at an animal shelter and was receptive to the suggestion that the disobedient dog might be trained for police work.

The Sheriff’s Office found a way to harness the puppy’s energy and Boomer completed training with Sheriff’s Office Detective Mike Carbone to become an explosives-sniffing specialist in 2018.