“Motivational” Morris County Sheriff’s Office Detective Lieutenant Kelley Zienowicz To Be Promoted To Chief Sheriff’s Officer Position

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon has selected Kelley Zienowicz as the person to lead the Sheriff’s Office into the future.

Kelley Zienowicz, a graduate of the elite FBI National Academy, will be promoted to the rank of Chief Morris County Sheriff’s Officer, the highest-level Officer position in the Sheriff’s Office Bureau of Law Enforcement.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon with Sheriff's Office Chief Officer Kelley Zienowicz
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon with Sheriff’s Office Chief Officer Kelley Zienowicz

Chief Zienowicz’s promotion will formally take place on Sept. 3, 2019, during a swearing-in ceremony, making her the highest-ranking woman in the Morris County Sheriff’s Office and the sole female chief in Morris County.

“I am so proud to announce the promotion of Kelley Zienowicz to Chief Sheriff’s Officer of the Morris County Sheriff’s Office,” Sheriff James M. Gannon said.

“Chief Zienowicz has a temperament that motivates and energizes others. She is highly-educated, a graduate of the elite FBI National Academy, and a true leader with an impeccable work ethic.”

“With Chief Zienowicz at the helm of day-to-day operations overseeing all divisions in the Sheriff’s Office Bureau of Law Enforcement, we will accomplish great things which the people of Morris County deserve,” Sheriff Gannon said.

“Not only am I proud to have the backing of the Sheriff, I know this is an important time for the agency as a whole. I hope to bring positive  motivation to the agency, from the top to the bottom,” Chief Zienowicz said.

As Chief, she will be responsible for management and day-to-day oversight over the Bureau of Law Enforcement’s four divisions: Support Services, Protective Services, Legal Services, and Special Services, which includes the Crime Lab and Crime Scene Investigation Unit.

Chief Zienowicz – who has received multiple awards, including the New Jersey Women in Law Enforcement Breaking the Glass Ceiling Award – will be promoted to Chief from her previous rank of Detective Lieutenant.

Chief Zienowicz grew up in Chester and attended Villa Walsh Academy.  She earned a bachelor of arts degree in psychology from Boston College in 1999, and a master of arts degree in forensic psychology from John Jay College in New York City in 2003.

She began her career with the Morris County Sheriff’s Office in 1999 as a civilian clerk-typist assigned to the Internal Affairs Section.  Within a year, she was hired as a Sheriff’s Investigator and in 2001, she attended and completed training at the Morris County Police Academy.

Chief Zienowicz was first assigned to the Protective Services Division, which provides security and judicial protection at the courthouse complex.

In August 2001, she was assigned to the Criminal Investigation Section – now called Crime Scene Investigation (CSI) – and spent 11 years in the Unit, assisting in multiple criminal investigations throughout Morris County.

She was called as a witness for the prosecution in several high-profile criminal cases in Superior Court between 2003 and 2014. She was qualified as an expert fingerprint witness in the sexual assault trial and retrial of Andrew Pena, and testified about evidence in the murder trials of Jose Feliciano, convicted of murdering the Rev. Edward Hinds in Chatham in 2009; Anthony Novellino, convicted of killing his former wife, Judith, in Denville; and Carlos Rojas, found guilty of bludgeoning Esteban Hernandez Vazquez and leaving his body in the trunk of a car abandoned in Lincoln Park.

Chief Zienowicz was promoted to the rank of Sergeant in April 2012 and assigned to the Legal Services Division as the Executions and Foreclosure Section Supervisor. That promotion was followed on March 1, 2016, by another advancement to the rank of Detective Lieutenant.

She was assigned the post of Division Commander in the Administrative Division, overseeing Internal Affairs and the Special Operations Section. She then was transferred to the Protective Services Division in September 2016, where she oversaw the courthouse complex and operations and security at the Dover Probation Office.

One of her most profound pleasures was her nomination to attend the 273rd Session of the prestigious FBI National Academy, a 10-week course of study in Quantico, Virginia, in the summer of 2018. Sheriff Gannon, who backed the nomination, is an FBI National Academy Graduate, as well.

The FBI National Academy is a professional course of study for U.S. and international law enforcement managers who are nominated by their agency heads because of their demonstrated leadership abilities. The program provides coursework on intelligence theory, terrorism, terrorist mindsets, management science, law, behavioral science, communication and forensic science to improve the administration of justice in police departments and agencies.

Upon returning from the FBI National Academy, Chief Zienowicz in September 2018 was transferred to the Special Services Division, overseeing CSI, Evidence Section, and the Bomb Unit.

Assisting in the implementation of new technologies at the Sheriff’s Office, Chief Zienowicz was a member of the Evidence Unit start-up team for the BEAST evidence tracking system, guided implementation of the CivilServe civil process database system in the Executions and Foreclosure Unit, and coordinated use of the new Computer Aided Dispatch System within the Protective Services Division.

Chief Zienowicz has logged a voluminous number of hours on training, including intensive courses on crash reconstruction, supervision of police personnel, shooting analysis and reconstruction, and interpretation of bloodstain patterns.

She has received the Sheriff’s Achievement Award, Exceptional Duty Award, Unit Citation Medal, Professional Service Medal, Educational Achievement Medal-Masters Degree, Morris County Detective’s Association Distinguished Achievement Unit Award, and the NJ Women in Law Enforcement Breaking the Glass Ceiling Award, which is awarded to women who achieve a law enforcement rank of lieutenant or higher.

Chief Zienowicz is a three-time Police Unity Tour rider and participates annually in the Special Olympics Torch Run.

 

 

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon Offers Back-To-School Safety Tips For Students and Motorists

As of Monday, August 26, classes will resume for school-age children in some parts of Morris County and for thousands of others, school doors will open right after Labor Day.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon Offers Back-To-School Safety Tips For Students and Motorists

“School should be an exhilarating and joyful time for kids, their teachers and parents. It can stay that way if motorists slow down, patiently share the roads with buses, yield to pedestrians in crosswalks, and stay alert for exuberant kids darting into roadways,” Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon said.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon

The National Safety Council and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recommend multiple back-to-school safety precautions:

  • Children who walk to school should use a sidewalk whenever possible, or walk on the edge of the street facing traffic if there is no sidewalk. Before school starts, parents should practice the walk with their child;
  • Children under the age of 10 should be walked to school by an adult or other responsible person;
  • Always use marked crosswalks to cross the street where they are available, and look left-right-left for vehicles or bicycles before crossing;
  • Watch the road when walking, not your cell phone;
  • Never play, push or shove others while walking around traffic;
  • Children who bike to school should wear a helmet;
  • Bicycle in the same direction as traffic and follow traffic signs and signals, and stay in a bike lane when possible;
  • Don’t use electronics while riding;
  • Children who ride a school bus should always wait until the bus comes to a complete stop and the bus driver says it’s OK to board;
  • Face forward after finding a seat on the bus and obey directions issued by the bus driver;
  • Exit the bus when it stops and always look left-right-left for cars before crossing a street;
  • Never chase after a school bus if you’ve missed it;
  • Motorists who drop their children off at school must follow specific drop-off procedures. Don’t double-park, it blocks visibility for other children and vehicles;
  • Don’t load or unload children across the street from the school;
  • Motorists should allow a greater following distance when driving behind a bus, and never pass a bus from behind if it stopped to load or unload children;
  • Since the area 10 feet around a school bus is the most dangerous for children, stop far enough back to allow children enough space to safely enter and exit the bus;
  • Motorists must always stop for a school patrol officer or crossing guard holding up a stop sign;
  • Never pass a vehicle stopped for pedestrians

Morris County Sheriff’s Office Hosts “Criminal Justice Day” For Team Eagle Foundation Youth Leadership Group

Youth participants in the Leadership Excellence Direct Results (LEDR) program received an enlightening overview of how the Morris County Sheriff’s Office protects the Morris County Courthouse, manages the Correctional Facility, and provides specialized K-9, Bomb Squad and Crime Scene Investigation Services to the county’s 39 municipalities.

Morris County Sheriff's Office K-9 Section Detective Sergeant Aaron Tomasini demonstrates the skills of K-9 Sigmund to participants of a leadership program run by the Team Eagle Foundation and Boy Scouts of America Patriots' Path Council.
Morris County Sheriff’s Office K-9 Section Detective Sergeant Aaron Tomasini demonstrates the skills of K-9 Sigmund to participants of a leadership program run by the Team Eagle Foundation and Boy Scouts of America Patriots’ Path Council.

The Sheriff’s Office – along with the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office and Office of Emergency Management – co-hosted Criminal Justice Day on Wednesday, August 14, for 28 participants of LEDR, a program of the non-profit Team Eagle Foundation that is partnered with the Boy Scouts of America, Patriots’ Path Council.

LEDR is a week-long retreat program that gives students, ages 15 to 20, the chance to explore leadership skills, connect with peers, explore careers, and learn how to engage with their communities.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon welcomes participants of a leadership program run by Team Eagle Foundation and the Boy Scouts of America Patriots' Path Council to the Morris County Correctional Facility.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon welcomes participants of a leadership program run by Team Eagle Foundation and the Boy Scouts of America Patriots’ Path Council to the Morris County Correctional Facility.

Criminal Justice Day for the LEDR group started at the 524-bed Morris County Correctional Facility in Morris Township. There, participants met Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon and Bureau of Corrections Undersheriff Alan J. Robinson, and were guided on a tour of the 19-year-old facility by Bureau of Corrections Sergeant Andrew Bileci and Officer Brian Rzucidlo.

Sheriff Gannon welcomed the group with a summary of the office that encompassed its historic, 1700’s origins, its array of special services, and its Correctional Facility programmatic approach to helping inmates improve and reshape their lives so they don’t return to incarceration.

The jail’s Hope Wing, for example, assists individuals with fighting their substance use addictions, teaches 84 coping skills, anger management and repairing familial relationships, among other topics.

Morris County Sheriff's Office Detective Corporal Phil Mangiafridda explains his job in the Crime Scene Investigation Unit to youth members of a leadership group run by Team Eagle Foundation in partnership with the Boy Scouts of America Patriots' Path Council.
Morris County Sheriff’s Office Detective Corporal Phil Mangiafridda explains his job in the Crime Scene Investigation Unit to youth members of a leadership group run by Team Eagle Foundation in partnership with the Boy Scouts of America Patriots’ Path Council.

“Unless we’re part of the solution we’re part of the problem,” Sheriff Gannon told the group.

“We want to knock recidivism down.  We don’t want people coming back here. We don’t want repeat customers,” he said.

“We will do everything in our power to return people to being productive members of society and keeping people alive,” the Sheriff said.

Members of the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office also gave an overview of their positions while gathered at the Correctional Facility before the LEDR group traveled to the Morris County Public Safety Training Academy for the afternoon.

At the Academy, LEDR participants met K-9 Sigmund and K-9 Handler, Morris County Sheriff’s Office Detective Sergeant Aaron Tomasini, Bomb Squad Detective Sergeant Doug Meyer, Crime Scene Investigation (CSI) Detective Corporal Phil Mangiafridda, Sheriff’s Office Motor Squad Detective Corporal Dave Kenny and Corporal Pete Lohmus, and Sheriff’s Emergency Response Team (SERT) Corporals Jamie Rae and Matt Cilurso.

Morris County Office of Emergency Management Director Jeffrey Paul and OEM Assistant Erika Hauser gave the LEDR group hands-on explanations of their equipment and vehicles, including an imposing mobile ambulance that is used to treat multiple victims of incidences and transport them to hospitals.