Sheriff James M. Gannon Joins Rabbinical College of America Leaders and Texas Congressmen In Dialogue On Security, Opioid Crisis

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon joined Rabbinical College of America leaders, two United States Congressmen from Texas, and other community and religious leaders on June 14 for a wide-ranging, roundtable luncheon discussion about security concerns, anti-Semitism, and the global opioid crisis.

From left, Rabbinical College of America Trustee Dr. Munr Kazmir, Morris County Freeholder Heather Darling, U.S. Rep. Will Hurd of Texas, Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, Rabbinical College of America Dean, Rabbi Moshe Herson, U.S. Rep. Michael T. McCaul Sr. of Texas, and Steven L. Rogers, Advisory Board of Donald J. Trump For President member.
From left, Rabbinical College of America Trustee Dr. Munr Kazmir, Morris County Freeholder Heather Darling, U.S. Rep. Will Hurd of Texas, Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, Rabbinical College of America Dean, Rabbi Moshe Herson, U.S. Rep. Michael T. McCaul Sr. of Texas, and Steven L. Rogers, Advisory Board of Donald J. Trump For President member.

Sheriff Gannon was a special guest of Dr. Munr Kazmir, a trustee of the renowned Rabbinical College of America in Morris Township and Vice Chairman of the American Jewish Congress. Sheriff Gannon joined guests United States Congressmen Michael T. McCaul Sr., and Will B. Hurd of Texas, along with Morris County Prosecutor Fredric M. Knapp and other community and religious leaders and officials.

The Rabbinical College of America Dean, Rabbi Moshe Herson, told the group that security at the College, a Chabad Lubovich campus which also has a primary school, is paramount in a world that is seeing an increase in anti-Semitic incidents.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon was at the Rabbinical College of America in Morris Township on June 14 for business, but students tried to corral him into a ball game.  At left is Rabbinical College of America Dean, Rabbi Moshe Herson.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon was at the Rabbinical College of America in Morris Township on June 14 for business, but students tried to corral him into a ball game. At left is Rabbinical College of America Dean, Rabbi Moshe Herson.

“This concern is not only ours, it’s a concern of the world,” Rabbi Herson said.

Sheriff Gannon stressed that security at schools and religious institutions in Morris County – which has 317 houses of worship, including 34 with Jewish congregations – is always a priority. Sheriff Gannon said officers in his department and local police routinely check houses of worship and religious institutions and extra patrols are directed to those locations during holidays.

The Sheriff’s Office, along with the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office, also are involved in assessing and advising the institutions on security infrastructure needs and paying close attention to behaviors that come to the attention of law enforcement that could put religious communities at risk, Sheriff Gannon said.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon on June 14 was part of a delegation of law enforcement, community and religious leaders that met at the Rabbinical College of America in Morris Township. From left, Sheriff Gannon, College Trustee Dr. Munr Kazmir, College Dean, Rabbi Moshe Herson, and U.S. Rep. Michael T. McCaul Sr. of Texas.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon on June 14 was part of a delegation of law enforcement, community and religious leaders that met at the Rabbinical College of America in Morris Township. From left, Sheriff Gannon, College Trustee Dr. Munr Kazmir, College Dean, Rabbi Moshe Herson, and U.S. Rep. Michael T. McCaul Sr. of Texas.

The Sheriff told the group he met earlier in the week with Chabad rabbis in Morris County to discuss their security concerns. Another group participant, military veteran and former Nutley police officer Steven L. Rogers, who now is on the Advisory Board of Donald J. Trump For President, noted the importance of having police on the streets to meet residents and be alert for information about plans for wrongdoing.

U.S. Rep. McCaul, who represents the 10th Congressional District in Texas and now is the ranking top Republican on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, noted that $75 million in federal grants are being earmarked to assist Jewish organizations with security projects.

“We want to make sure there’s no place for anti-Semitism in this country or in this world,” Congressman McCaul said.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon is interviewed at the Rabbinical College of America in Morris Township, where he was part of a delegation that met with college leaders about security concerns and global issues, including the opioid crisis.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon is interviewed at the Rabbinical College of America in Morris Township, where he was part of a delegation that met with college leaders about security concerns and global issues, including the opioid crisis.

Another topic that was common ground for the group was the need to curb the opioid epidemic, which led to Sheriff Gannon describing the program he launched in April 2017 – the Hope One mobile substance use outreach vehicle that visits areas in Morris County twice-weekly to offer free Narcan training and kits and guide people, with a stigma-free attitude, on substance use treatment options.

U.S. Rep. Hurd, a former CIA agent, left the luncheon believing that a dialogue was started: “The only way we’re going to solve our problems is if local communities, religious organizations and law enforcement work together,” he said.

Guests at the Rabbinical College of America on Friday also included Morris County Freeholder Heather Darling, Morris County First Assistant Prosecutor Thomas Zelante, Assemblies of God Bible Institute Rev. Raphael Ha, Dennis Gonzalez, Executive Officer of the U.S. Health and Human Services Department, Region 2, and Raj Patel.

Morris County Sheriff’s Office Lieutenant And Sergeant Co-Design Course To Improve Skills Of Legal Services Division Staff

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, L, stands with Detective Lt. Mark Chiarolanza and Sergeant Mike Turkot, Far Right, with FDU instructors and members of a Civil Litigation class that Officers Chiarolanza and Turkot co-designed.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, L, stands with Detective Lt. Mark Chiarolanza and Sergeant Mike Turkot, Far Right, with FDU instructors and members of a Civil Litigation class that Officers Chiarolanza and Turkot co-designed.

A Morris County Sheriff’s Office Lieutenant and Sergeant took the initiative to co-design a class for civilian employees of the Office’s Legal Services Division to enhance their knowledge of the intricacies of foreclosures, writs, wage garnishments and civil complaints.

Carol Sullivan, Supervisor of the Legal Services Division’s Finance Unit, and Tiffany DeFilippis, Supervisor of the Post-Sale Foreclosure Unit, recently completed the 13-week Civil Litigation course that Legal Services Division Detective Lieutenant Mark Chiarolanza and Sergeant Mike Turkot created in collaboration with Fairleigh Dickinson University’s Paralegal Studies Program.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon with Carol Sullivan, Supervisor of the Office's Legal Services Division Finance Unit, and Fairleigh Dickinson University Associate Dean For Continuing Education Dr. Deborah A. Fredericks.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon with Carol Sullivan, Supervisor of the Office’s Legal Services Division Finance Unit, and Fairleigh Dickinson University Associate Dean For Continuing Education Dr. Deborah A. Fredericks.

The Sheriff’s Officers partnered to design course curriculum with Dr. Deborah A. Fredericks, FDU’s Associate Dean for Continuing Education, and Attorney Andrew Lane, an adjunct professor of civil litigation at FDU who taught the course that drew 10 civilian Sheriff’s Office employees from Morris, Sussex, Mercer, Warren, Burlington and Hudson counties.

Detective Lieutenant Chiarolanza and Sergeant Turkot helped develop the curriculum to assist civilian employees – who handle thousands of documents annually – in fully understanding the purposes behind the filings and their critical roles in managing the paperwork.

Civilian staff in the Legal Services Division are trained in-house, and attend monthly meetings with their counterparts from other Sheriff’s Offices in the state, but the FDU class provided for a broader understanding of what otherwise could be viewed at times as mere data-entry.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, Sheriff's Office Post-Sale Foreclosure Unit Supervisor Tiffany DeFilippis, and Dr. Deborah A. Fredericks, Fairleigh Dickinson University Associate Dean for Continuing Education. Fair
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon, Sheriff’s Office Post-Sale Foreclosure Unit Supervisor Tiffany DeFilippis, and Dr. Deborah A. Fredericks, Fairleigh Dickinson University Associate Dean for Continuing Education.

 

“I applaud Detective Lieutenant Chiarolanza and Sergeant Turkot for their  ingenuity in helping to create this class, which will motivate and help staff better appreciate their vital roles in the Legal Services Division,” Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon said.

The 14 civilian staff members in the unit, depending on their specific jobs,  process summonses and complaints related to lawsuits or divorce filings, wage garnishments, bank levies, evictions, and other matters. The Sheriff’s Office provides a civil process service – the delivery of legal documents to parties – and other staff manage property foreclosures, from pre-sale foreclosure matters through officially conveying the ownership of real property auctioned at Sheriff’s sale.

In the regular course of business, money is collected, deposited, and transferred, with the Legal Services Division in 2018 handling upwards of $44 million moving in and out of its accounts, Detective Lieutenant Chiarolanza said.

The course curriculum included, but was not limited to: building basic legal vocabulary, exploring the attorney/paralegal relationship, identifying facts, issues and legal rationale, explanations of contract and tort causes of actions, drafting basic legal documents, preparation of deposition summaries and answers to interrogatories and simple motions, and discussion of the New Jersey Court Rules covering litigation, ethics, and Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.

 

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon: No Age is Immune From An Opioid Addiction

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon and Sheriff’s Office Corporal Erica Valvano on June 11 enlightened a lively Randolph Township Seniors Club on the dangers of opioid dependency and the Office’s mission to save lives from the grip of heroin.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon and Sheriff's Office Corporal Erica Valvano at a presentation June 11 to the Randolph Seniors Club on the opioid epidemic.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon and Sheriff’s Office Corporal Erica Valvano at a presentation June 11 to the Randolph Seniors Club on the opioid epidemic.

Invited by Seniors Club member Barbara Anderson to address the monthly meeting of the Seniors Club, Sheriff Gannon provided an overview of his Hope One mobile outreach program. Hope One has made 279 stops within Morris County since April 3, 2017, in areas known to be populated by homeless or at-risk groups and steered people to treatment services.

Since its debut, Hope One’s staff, overseen by Corporal Valvano, has made contact with 7,147 people, trained 1,759 people in the use of Narcan to reverse an opioid overdose, and directed at least 228 people to recovery, rehab or mental health services.

The presentation was attended by Randolph Township Health Educator Kristine Wilsusen who said senior citizens need to be as educated as younger people about the perils of opioid use.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon speaks to members of the Randolph Seniors Club after his presentation on the opioid epidemic in Morris County on June 11.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon speaks to members of the Randolph Seniors Club after his presentation on the opioid epidemic in Morris County on June 11.

“The elderly think this kind of thing doesn’t happen to them but they’re wrong,” Mrs. Anderson said.

Sheriff Gannon told the crowd that Hope One has a stigma-free approach to encounters with everyone who stops at the resource and recovery vehicle, and deaths by opioid overdoses in Morris County and the state affect people of all ages and socioeconomic backgrounds.

Morris County Sheriff's Office Corporal Erica Valvano speaks to members of the Randolph Seniors Club about the opioid crisis and other programs offered by the Sheriff's Office.
Morris County Sheriff’s Office Corporal Erica Valvano speaks to members of the Randolph Seniors Club about the opioid crisis and other programs offered by the Sheriff’s Office.

“We’ve seen deaths in the last three years in Morris County from age 13 to people in their late 70’s. This is not necessarily a kid problem,” Sheriff Gannon said. The majority of people dying in Morris County by overdose started out using opioids as painkillers, he said.

Corporal Valvano distributed literature about other Sheriff’s Office’s programs, including Project Lifesaver and the Prescription Drug Drop Box Program.  Project Lifesaver is a program under which vulnerable people – those with Alzheimer’s Disease, dementia, Down Syndrome, Autism, and cognitive disorders and disabilities, and are fitted with a bracelet or anklet that has a transmitter attached that emits a signal police can track if a person goes missing.

Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon speaks to members of the Randolph Seniors Club after his presentation on June 11 to the group about the opioid epidemic in Morris County.
Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon speaks to members of the Randolph Seniors Club after his presentation on June 11 to the group about the opioid epidemic in Morris County.

Corporal Valvano stressed to Randolph Seniors Club members the value of the Prescription Drug Drop Box Program for properly disposing of unused or expired prescription medications to avoid the chance of the drugs being stolen or misused by others with access to them.