Morris County Sheriff’s Office K-9 Detectives Train With Dutch National Police K-9 Experts

      Morris County Sheriff’s Office K-9 Section Detectives Michael Carbone and John Granato and their dogs spent three days honing their skills in upstate New York with two, world-class K-9 instructors with the Dutch National Police in the Netherlands.

“This training with internationally-renowned K-9 handlers can only increase the expertise of the Morris County Sheriff’s Office K-9 Section, which provides critical security services, criminal apprehension and evidence detection in the county,” Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon said.

Morris County Sheriff's Officers in K-9 training
Morris County Sheriff’s Office K-9 Section Detective Michael Carbone (in green) faces Morris County Sheriff’s Office K-9 Detective John Granato during specialized K-9 training with Dutch National Police experts Hennie Bolster and Ruud Leus in upstate New York.

Detective Carbone brought K-9 Loco and Detective Granato brought K-9 Spike to the invitation-only seminar at Upstate K-9, LLC, taught by guest K-9 handlers and trainers Hennie Bolster and Ruud Leus of the Dutch National Police.

The seminar spanned Feb. 25 through Feb. 27, and covered K-9 detection functions as well as patrol functions that included tracking, evidence recovery, obedience and criminal apprehension, said Morris County Sheriff’s Office K-9 Section Detective Sergeant Aaron Tomasini.

Detective Carbone, an assistant trainer himself, also handles K-9 Boomer, whose specialty is explosives detection. Detective Granato’s second K-9 is Cinders, a certified accelerant detection dog.

The seminar exposed the detectives to training methods and techniques currently used by the Dutch National Police.

Morris County Sheriff's Officer with K-9 Spike
Morris County Sheriff’s Office K-9 Section Detective John Granato with K-9 Spike during specialized K-9 training in upstate New York with Dutch National Police experts Hennie Bolster and Ruud Leus.

“This type of seminar is a wonderful opportunity for our K-9 handlers to receive training from some of the best K-9 trainers the world has to offer,” Sgt. Tomasini said.

“With over 60 years of combined experience, Hennie and Ruud are a wealth of knowledge on both K-9 operations and K-9 training,” he said.

Officers Bolster and Leus have both spent decades training and judging K-9s for the Koninklijke Nederlandse Politiehond Vereniging (KNPV), which translates to the Royal Dutch Police Dog Association, according to their biographies.

The Netherlands, a country in western Europe that includes the province of Holland, has about 580 patrol dogs and 70 specialized searching dogs, the biographies state.